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Iraq: Chaldean Patriarch on Role of Laity in Eastern Churches

'Common Priesthood' Served by all the Baptized

The post Iraq: Chaldean Patriarch on Role of Laity in Eastern Churches appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Philippines: Mission Priest Warns Extremist Groups Inciting Division

'They want to divide Christians and Muslims and take advantage of the situation to provoke chaos throughout the country and challenge its balance...'

The post Philippines: Mission Priest Warns Extremist Groups Inciting Division appeared first on ZENIT - English.

US: Bishops Ask Prayers for Victims of Midwest Flooding

'At least nine million people in fourteen states have been affected by rising water levels along rivers and creeks in the central United States.'

The post US: Bishops Ask Prayers for Victims of Midwest Flooding appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Templeton Prize winner believes science, spirituality are complementary

IMAGE: CNS photo/Eli Burakian, Dartmouth College

By

WEST CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. (CNS) -- A Dartmouth College cosmologist and theoretical physicist, who considers himself a religious agnostic even though he has devoted his career to examining link between science, philosophy and spirituality in exploring the mystery of creation, is the 2019 Templeton Prize winner.

Marcelo Gleiser, 60, often describes science as an "engagement with the mysterious" because he believes it cannot be separated from humanity's relationship with the natural world.

A native of Brazil, he is the first Latin American to be named a Templeton Prize Laureate.

In announcing the award March 19, the John Templeton Foundation called Gleiser "a prominent voice among scientists, past and present, who reject the notion that science alone can lead to ultimate truths about the nature of reality."

The Templeton Prize, established in 1972 by Sir John Templeton, aims to recognize someone "who has made an exceptional contribution to affirming life's spiritual dimension, whether through insight, discovery or practical works."

Gleiser's work has earned international acclaim. His books are best-sellers, especially in his homeland, and his television series has drawn millions of viewers.

"The path to scientific understanding and scientific exploration is not just about the material part of the world," Gleiser said in a videotaped acceptance of the prize released by the foundation, based in West Conshohocken. "My mission is to bring back to science and to the people that are interested in science, the attachment to the mysterious, to make people understand that science is just one other way for us to engage with the mystery of who we are."

Despite his agnosticism, Gleiser has disavowed atheism.

"I see atheism as being inconsistent with the scientific method as it is, essentially, belief in nonbelief," he said in a 2018 interview with Scientific American. "You may not believe in God, but to affirm its nonexistence with certain is not scientifically consistent."

Among Gleiser's significant scientific contributions is his work as a co-discoverer in 1994 of "oscillons," which the foundation described as "small, long-lived energy 'lumps' made of many particles." He continues to study their properties.

His current research involves the use of information theory to explore how the stability of physical systems -- from subatomic particles to massive structures in the universe -- is encrypted in the complexity of their shapes.

The foundation said Gleiser also focuses on the origin of life on earth, examining the role of biochemical asymmetries in the early formation of polymers, the precursors to complex biomolecules. In addition, his views have risen in prominence in the growing astrobiology field.

Gleiser was born in Rio de Janiero and was raised in the Jewish community, attending Hebrew school. He graduated from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janiero in 1981 and later received a doctorate in theoretical physics from King's College London.

He joined the Dartmouth College faculty in Hanover, New Hampshire, at age 32, teaching physics and astronomy. By the time he was named a full professor at the school in 1998, Gleiser had expanded his scientific views into a larger cultural context, the foundation said.

His work led to his first book, "The Dancing Universe," which was developed as a college textbook for non-science majors. It explored the philosophical and religious roots of scientific thinking and their influence throughout human history and result in Gleiser's rise as a public intellectual.

The prize includes a cash award of more than $1.4 million. A formal award ceremony is scheduled May 29 in New York.

Previous Templeton Prize winners include religious figures St. Teresa of Kolkata, Anglican Bishop Desmond Tutu, the Rev. Billy Graham and the Dalai Lama as well as scientists Martin Rees and Freeman Dyson.

 

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

In Syria, Caritas works to promote understanding among neighbors

IMAGE: CNS photo/Muhammad Hamed, Reuters

By Dale Gavlak

RAMTHA, Jordan (CNS) -- As Syria's civil war enters its ninth year, citizens in and outside the country find themselves in limbo. Catholic and other aid agencies are urging a swift resolution to the crisis.

Caritas Syria is campaigning for "an immediate end to the violence and suffering" and calling for "all sides of the conflict to come together to find a peaceful solution," chiefly through reconciliation work.

"We are initiating reconciliation among the various communities to correct misconceptions in the minds of those living in Damascus, Ghouta, Aleppo and elsewhere about people outside their religious community," said Sandra Awad, communications director for the Catholic aid agency Caritas Syria.

Caritas Syria is the country's branch of Caritas Internationalis, the Catholic Church's international network of charitable agencies.

Awad told Catholic News Service by telephone from Damascus that a meal involving Christians, Alawites and Muslims brought about a wonderful understanding and compassion for the suffering shared by all.

She said a Christian woman told her at the start of the lunch that she did not want to sit next to a woman wearing a headscarf because Muslims had kidnapped her son. Militants had entered her home and beat her son, resulting in psychological problems for him. They shot another son's legs, leaving him paralyzed. The militants kidnapped the third son with his wife and child.

But Awad said she told her, "This woman with the headscarf lost her husband from mortar shelling, and her 15-year-old son lost his legs. She is taking care of her children by herself without any income."

The Christian woman then responded: "Yes, all of us have suffered."

"I could see her ideas begin to change," Awad said. "The people spoke about the pain they experienced during the war. They began to feel that people have suffered as much as themselves and perhaps even more," she said and, as a result, they got along together.

During a Caritas-sponsored visit to the Damascus suburb of Ghouta, a Muslim man questioned why militants were calling for people to be killed, rather than supported.

"Let them see who is helping us," he said. "A Christian organization is helping us now."

Caritas' reconciliation efforts underline the practical support it provides to thousands of Syrians by distributing food baskets, clothes and blankets as well as medical assistance and psychosocial support.

Pope Francis has been closely engaged with the Syrian crisis, consistently calling for an end to the fighting. He has acknowledged the assistance Caritas gives to Syrians regardless of their ethnic or religious affiliation as the best way to contribute toward peace.

Syria's war has killed more than 400,000 people and forced more than 6 million Syrians out of their homes inside Syria; 5.5 million have fled to neighboring countries since the outbreak of the conflict in 2011.

CAFOD, the Catholic international development charity in England and Wales, and Catholic Relief Services, the U.S. bishops' international aid and development agency, are part of the Caritas network.

In a statement provided to Catholic News Service, CAFOD said it "believes that until a political process addresses the underlying issues that led to the Syrian war, there will be no safe future in Syria for the millions of Syrians caught up in this conflict.

Syrian refugees sheltering in neighboring Jordan and Lebanon, many for longer than they ever imagined, have expressed concern for their future.

"My family believes that we cannot return to Syria because our home was destroyed, so there is nothing to go back to," Um Mohamed, using her familial name in Arabic, told CNS in the northern Jordanian border town of Ramtha, which abuts Syria. "But we're also finding it impossible to stay in Jordan because there is no work, my husband is sick, and our savings are running out."

Another Syrian refugee at the large Zaatari camp, also near the border, said she is worried about her son left behind in Syria.

"He was living in an area controlled by the rebels, although he didn't fight with them. But because of being in that place, he and other young Syrian men have turned themselves into the Syrian authorities in the hopes of getting a lesser jail term," Um Sami told CNS, saying the Syrian government views them with suspicion.

"But the fear is that the government will forcibly conscript these men into the Syrian military and put them in frontline positions without any training. Or, what if my son is never seen again?" she said, her eyes welling with tears.

Other Syrian refugees are fearful that the regime considers them "traitors."

"A lot of young men left Syria because they didn't want to fight in the conflict," Maha Yahya, director of the Carnegie Middle East Center, told CNS.

"A lot of refugees said to me, 'I left so I don't kill, and I don't get killed.' Even if they go back today, there is a new amnesty law, but there are no guarantees that they won't be thrown into prison or sent to the frontline," she explained.

Other refugees around Zahle, near the Syrian border in Lebanon, said they, too, fear a return, but for some there is no other choice.

A Christian aid worker told CNS about a Syrian widow who died unexpectedly in March. She left behind three young children who must go back to Syria to join relatives to care for them. But these family members live in the militant stronghold of Idlib in Syria's north, making their fate uncertain.

Eight million Syrian children are now in need of assistance, including psychosocial support, according to the U.N. children's agency, UNICEF.

"Every single Syrian child has been impacted by violence, loss, displacement, family separation and lack of access to basic services, including health and education. Grave violations of children's rights -- recruitment, abductions, killing and maiming continue unabated," UNICEF said March 6.

Syrians live without "peace or war," Maronite Archbishop Samir Nassar of Damascus, told the Vatican news agency, Fides, March 11. "It's an uncertain and difficult situation, which is becoming unsustainable for the weakest," he said.

Archbishop Nassar warned that Syria's historic Christian population has decreased in some areas by 77 percent, compared to the time before the conflict.

 

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Cardinal Parolin celebrates 150th anniversary of children's hospital

IMAGE: CNS photo/Vatican Media

By Junno Arocho Esteves

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The Vatican-owned Bambino Gesu Children's Hospital in Rome is a sign of the Catholic Church's commitment to caring for and protecting the dignity of the sick, said Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican secretary of state.

Commemorating the hospital's 150th anniversary March 19, Cardinal Parolin said that the identity of Bambino Gesu Hospital is rooted in Jesus' call to care for the ever-evolving needs of the sick in a "prophetic" way.

"Even if the situation has radically changed since the time of its first pioneering experiences, the church will never stop paying attention to the sick with that look of love and with that 'prophetic' attitude," Cardinal Parolin said.

Founded in 1869 by Duchess Arabella and Duke Scipione Salviati, it became the first pediatric hospital on the Italian peninsula.

In an effort to guarantee the hospital would have a secure future, in 1924 the Salviati family donated it to Pope Pius XI.

Over time, the hospital added new pavilions, new operating rooms and new outpatient departments. Today, with two branches outside Rome, Bambino Gesu Children's Hospital is one of the most modern and well-equipped pediatric facilities in the country.

Among those present at the 150th anniversary celebration were Italian President Sergio Mattarella, Rome Mayor Virginia Raggi and various local officials as well as hospital staff.

Cardinal Parolin said that church-run hospitals like Bambino Gesu are a sign of the Catholic Church's "constant attention to the human person."

Love, he said, is not only demonstrated in the effectiveness of the hospital's assistance to patients but also "in the ability to be close in solidarity with those who suffer."

"Putting the sick at the center means, among other things, knowing how to combine the action of curing the disease with that of taking care of the whole patient, of his or her person and of his or her emotional, relational, psychological and even spiritual world," the cardinal said.

Although Bambino Gesu Hospital carries out its mission in Italy, Cardinal Parolin said it also shares the universal mission of the Catholic Church to proclaim God's love in the farthest corners of the world.

The commitment of Bambino Gesu Hospital to expanding and training staff at a pediatric hospital in Bangui, Central African Republic, he said, "is a testimony that for Bambino Gesu Hospital, there are no walls or boundaries, nor race or religious affiliation that separate it from charity."

"With great passion," the cardinal said, "we want to continue our great task of taking care of sick children, including those who in their countries do not have the possibility, as a sign of the charity of Jesus Christ and his church and to open up and embrace with hope the future that lies before us."

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Follow Arocho on Twitter: @arochoju

 

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

U.S. Bishops’ Chairman Offers Prayers for Recovery, After Flooding in the Midwest

WASHINGTON—After historic flooding brought devastation to parts of the Midwest, Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Florida and Chairman of the U.S. Bishops’ Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, expressed grief over the lives lost and threatened by the floods and offered prayers for recovery.

The full statement follows:

“We are deeply saddened by the loss of life and the damage caused by the flooding throughout the Midwest these past few days. As of this writing, at least nine million people in fourteen states have been affected by rising water levels along rivers and creeks in the central United States. Four people have been killed by swift currents and rising floodwaters. Heavy rainfall and melting snow from this winter’s powerful storms continue to threaten the lives and livelihoods of many as the floodwaters are not expected to recede until later this week.

It is our prayer that those affected by the floods will find the strength to rebuild. We trust that the Lord will console them in their suffering. Let us answer the Lord’s call to love one another and generously support our neighbors in this time of need.”
Donations can be made to Catholic Charities USA at https://catholiccharitiesusa.org.

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Keywords: United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, Bishop Frank Dewane, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Midwest, Missouri River

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Media Contact:
Judy Keane
202-541-3200

 

Venezuela: Bishops Speak Out Over Electricity Blackout

'In this time of legal darkness, there has been added a literal darkness'

The post Venezuela: Bishops Speak Out Over Electricity Blackout appeared first on ZENIT - English.

France: Cardinal Barbarin Withdraws from His Diocese for a Time

Pope Francis Did Not Accept His Resignation

The post France: Cardinal Barbarin Withdraws from His Diocese for a Time appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Solemnity of St. Joseph is Feast Day of Pope Benedict XVI

'After the great Pope, John Paul II, the Lord Cardinals have elected me, a simple, humble worker in the Lord’s vineyard.'

The post Solemnity of St. Joseph is Feast Day of Pope Benedict XVI appeared first on ZENIT - English.