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Jesus replaced law of revenge with law of love, pope says

IMAGE: CNS photo/Yara Nardi, Reuters

By Carol Glatz

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The scales of justice cannot solve everything, especially when it comes to stopping a cycle of evil vengeance, Pope Francis said.

"Evil knows revenge and if it is not halted, it risks spreading, suffocating the whole world," he said April 24 during his weekly general audience.

Christians must forgive and love others even beyond what is due to stop the cycle of evil and to start things anew, he told thousands of people gathered in St. Peter's Square, which was still decorated with bright yellow, red and other colorful flowers from his Easter celebrations.

Pope Francis continued his audience talks about the Lord's Prayer by looking at how people ask God to "forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us."

The use of the word "trespasses" in the original Greek of the Gospel means "being in debt," so this part of the prayer recognizes how much people are in debt to God, especially for the gift of life and his infinite love and mercy, the pope said.

The so-called "'self-made man' doesn't exist in the church," he said, because Christians recognize the divine gifts and graces bestowed on them and the "beneficial conditions in life" they received from others.

"Those who pray, learn to say, 'Thank you.' Many times, we forget to say, 'Thank you.' We are selfish."

Those who seek to live a Christian life also realize "there always will be something" for which they will need to ask God's forgiveness, for example, for being too lazy or letting rancor take over one's heart, he said.

It would have been wonderful, the pope said, if the prayer only asked God to forgive one's debts to him, however, God asks for more.

"God's grace, so abundant, is always challenging" because God asks people to do unto others, what he has done for them. "God, who is good, invites all of us to be good," the pope added.

"Whoever has received a lot must learn to give a lot and not keep it all for oneself," Pope Francis said. God always offers his infinite love, mercy and forgiveness "vertically," from heaven to earth, and he expects it to be redistributed and given anew, "horizontally," among his children.

People are called to reflect that divine love and forgiveness onto others, he said, and create "a new relationship with our brothers and sisters," with one's friends, family, neighbors and even those "who have done something that is not wonderful."

The pope explained how this could be seen in the Parable of the Unforgiving Servant (Mt. 18:21-35), in which a king forgave his servant's enormous debt, but the same servant refused to forgive a much smaller debt he was owed by another. The king punished the servant for not showing the same pity and compassion he had received.

The parable shows, the pope said, "If you do not push yourself to forgive, you will not be forgiven; if you do not push yourself to love, you will not be loved" at the final judgment.

Jesus shows the power of forgiveness, he said.

"Not everything in life is resolved with justice. No. Especially where a counterweight to evil must be placed, someone must love beyond what is due, to rebegin a story of grace."

Jesus replaces the law of revenge with the law of love: "What God has done for me, I return to you," he said.

In the days after Easter, the pope asked people reflect on whether they are able to forgive, and if they feel they can't, "ask the Lord for this grace because it is a grace" to be able to forgive.

"With a word, a hug, a smile, we can share with others that which we have received" -- the even more precious gift of God's forgiveness, the pope said.

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Update: Volunteer gardener at crisis maternity home provides balm for the wounded

IMAGE: CNS photo/John Farmer de la Torre, Catholic Charities of Southern Missouri

By Dennis Sadowski

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Outside of a week or two in the darkest days of winter, it's always gardening season for Jana Hukriede.

A key volunteer at Catholic Charities of Southern Missouri's LifeHouse Crisis Maternity Home in Springfield, Hukriede finds that hardly a day passes in which she is not organizing volunteers, looking for bargains on gardening supplies and planning which vegetables to plant when in the numerous raised beds at the home's 11-acre property.

Hukriede, 69, a retired Catholic school teacher, has been at it for seven years and has seen her involvement grow into one that the women who live at the maternity home have come to appreciate and welcome.

Catholic Charities USA recognized Hukriede's commitment as its 2019 volunteer of the year. She will be honored during the agency's annual gathering Sept. 25-27 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. She kidded that she hopes the ceremony won't interfere with her garden schedule.

Hukriede said she started volunteering after seeing an invitation in her parish bulletin at Holy Trinity Church because she "felt moved by the Spirit."

"I thought, 'Well, gosh, what can I do to help?'" she recalled.

Joined by the dozens of volunteers she has recruited -- mostly retirees, but occasionally the group includes a few strapping college students who stop by to aid with a major project -- Hukriede has helped create a caring community focused on meeting the needs of pregnant women and young mothers challenged by homelessness, domestic violence or addictions.

Her efforts have led to a gradual expansion of the garden. The harvest of kale, broccoli, onions, green beans, tomatoes, potatoes and squash has increased enough to become a significant source of healthy food for LifeHouse residents. Not only does Hukriede's team grow and harvest the food, but they have helped the women get involved in weeding, harvesting and canning the produce that is grown.

There's now a greenhouse on site so that vegetables can be grown year-round and Hurkiede is eyeing the eventual installation of a water irrigation system.

"It's just so gratifying, too, to get other people involved and work as a team for a common goal," Hukriede told Catholic News Service. "We all know we are doing a great service for Catholic Charities and the women at LifeHouse."

Michele Marsh, LifeHouse director, described Hukriede as motivated to serve women who have had more than their share of hardship in life.

"She a joyful person. She's dedicated. Really, she's inspired so many people. And she's a good role model," Marsh said.

It's more than the garden to which Hukriede has committed her time. She continues as an on-call substitute teacher, is a lector and extraordinary minister of holy Communion at Holy Trinity, and helps prepare meals after funerals for parishioners.

She said her husband of 34 years, Malcolm, supports her effort. The couple's son John, 36, is married and has a 3-year-old son with wife Linsey. Their son Stephen was born with cerebral palsy and died in 2010 at age 24.

Hukriede said she is pleased to be recognized for her volunteerism, but that awards are not why she has devoted so much time to gardening at LifeHouse.

"It's about giving service," she said. "That's what Jesus modeled."

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Follow Sadowski on Twitter: @DennisSadowski

 

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

General Audience: Pope Offers Special Thought for Young, Elderly, Sick, Newlyweds

'May you be able to have an experience of the living Jesus'

The post General Audience: Pope Offers Special Thought for Young, Elderly, Sick, Newlyweds appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Pope Francis Stresses Saying ‘Thank You’ in Prayer

'Try as we might, an overwhelming debt remains before God'

The post Pope Francis Stresses Saying ‘Thank You’ in Prayer appeared first on ZENIT - English.

April 24, 2019 General Audience (Full Text)

Pope Francis Resumes Catecheses on 'Our Father'

The post April 24, 2019 General Audience (Full Text) appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Cardinal Bo Decries ‘Senseless Violence,’ Expresses ‘Sincere Anguish’ Over Sri Lanka Bombing Victims

In Message provided to Zenit to Cardinal Ranjith, Condemns Easter Sunday Tragedy Taking 'scores of innocent human lives on very day we celebrate victory of life & goodness over death & evil'

The post Cardinal Bo Decries ‘Senseless Violence,’ Expresses ‘Sincere Anguish’ Over Sri Lanka Bombing Victims appeared first on ZENIT - English.

General Audience: Pope: We Can Be Confident God Will Forgive Us, When We Ask With Contrite Hearts

'The message is clear: if you refuse to forgive, then you will not be forgiven'

The post General Audience: Pope: We Can Be Confident God Will Forgive Us, When We Ask With Contrite Hearts appeared first on ZENIT - English.

‘Let Faith in Jesus Make Us See Power of Resurrection in Our Lives’ — Cardinal Bo’s Easter Message

'Darkness never wins.  Christ is the  light,  Lumen Christi'   

The post ‘Let Faith in Jesus Make Us See Power of Resurrection in Our Lives’ — Cardinal Bo’s Easter Message appeared first on ZENIT - English.

Update: Bishop says 'love of Christ' compels him to proclaim Gospel of life

IMAGE: CNS photo/Tyler Orsburn

By Kurt Jensen

WASHINGTON (CNS) -- Preservation of the family, marriage and the unborn were the main themes of the annual National Catholic Prayer Breakfast at the Marriott Marquis hotel in Washington April 23.

"Faith in the crucified and risen Christ shields us from two cold and deadly sins: arrogant presumption and cynical despair," said Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted of Phoenix, the guest speaker. "Neither of which are appropriate in a Christian leader. The enemy of our souls does not care which we prefer."

Bishop Olmsted, who is a consultant to the pro-life committee of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, said the matter of legal abortion has defined his ministry, since he was ordained a priest in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1973, the year of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision, which legalized abortion on demand.

"It is my pastoral duty to proclaim the Gospel of life and the protection in law of the most vulnerable among us. The love of Christ compels me."

Bishop Olmsted also recalled the words of St. John Paul II at a Mass on the National Mall in October 1979: "We will stand up and proclaim that no one ever has the authority to destroy unborn life."

Speaking of the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, recently blocked by House Democrats, Bishop Olmsted asked, "Where does blatant disregard for a child's life come from? From hardened hearts. A child demands love, and love costs."

"Any rejection of bodiliness," he added, "will immediately target two beautiful but demanding and sometimes inconvenient realities: marriage and the human child." Marriage, he said, "stands now in the way of the gender ideology. We Christians will stand for the reality of marriage today in our homes and the public square, even when facing persecution today."

A rapidly lowering birth rate in the United States, he said, means that the warning about contraception in St. Paul VI's 1968 encyclical, "Humanae Vitae," has come true, and "the disaster invited by theologians, bishops, priests and laity who protested Paul VI's prophetic letter is upon us," with sexual pleasure separated from procreation. "Enough!"

"Christians are called not to complacency, but to greatness, to have hearts great enough to be filled with God," Bishop Olmsted concluded.

Mick Mulvaney, the acting White House chief of staff and director of the Office of Management and Budget, spoke briefly about President Donald Trump's commitment to religious liberty.

"The president has allowed us Christians, of all denominations, to be very vocal about their faith and to prioritize our faith," he said. "Over the past two-and-a-half years, I think you can see the principles of our faith being manifested." Trump has addressed the annual March for Life rally via a video hookup the past two years.

"I can assure you," Mulvaney added, that he has sat in the Oval Office many times when Trump has admonished foreign leaders and diplomats in saying, "You're not doing enough to take care of the Christians in your country," or has praised them with "thank you for taking care of the Christians in your country."

"I won't lie to you, that that's pretty powerful stuff. To be able to be there, to be part of that, has been very invigorating," said Mulvaney, a member of Opus Dei and a graduate of Georgetown University.

"I'm comfortable as a Catholic, even though I'm working for a president who is not Catholic, that the principles of our faith are alive and well and well respected in this administration and driving many of our policies," he added.

The 1,400 attendees gave a standing ovation to Ted and Julie Sandmann, parents of Nick Sandmann, the Covington (Kentucky) Catholic High School student who was thrown into the center of a national spotlight in January when videos of him and his classmates interacting with Native Americans and others near Washington's Lincoln Memorial went viral.

Also garnering a loud ovation was Abby Johnson, the pro-life activist who runs And Then There Were None, a ministry to former abortion clinic workers, who was recently portrayed in the film drama "Unplanned," which proved to be successful at the box office.

"The critics, they thought we'd make 40 bucks, and we're sitting on $17 million right now," she said. The film, which cost $6 million to make, is her story as a former director of a Planned Parenthood clinic who eventually rejected abortion to join the pro-life movement.

"I'm waking up every day getting emails from people; who told me they walked into the film pro-choice and walked out pro-life. This is why we decided to do 'Unplanned' -- for the conversion of hearts."

Also speaking were Sister Bethany Madonna, vocations director of the Sisters of Life, and Curtis Martin, the founder and CEO of the Fellowship of Catholic University Students.

The breakfast has been held annually since 2004. The event was established in 2004 in response to St. John Paul's call for a new evangelization. George W. Bush has the only president to address the gathering, doing so from 2005 to 2008. Vice President Mike Pence addressed the breakfast in 2017.

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Curia reforms put priority on evangelization, synodality, cardinals say

IMAGE: CNS/Paul Haring

By Carol Glatz

ROME (CNS) -- The proposed apostolic constitution for reforming and governing the Roman Curia is expected to emphasize the church's missionary mandate with the creation of a "super-dicastery" merging two offices dedicated to evangelization.

"The main point of the new apostolic constitution is that the church's mission is evangelization. It puts it at the center of the church and of everything the Curia does," Cardinal Oswald Gracias of Mumbai, India, told Vida Nueva, a Spanish weekly publication dedicated to news about the Catholic Church.

Cardinals Gracias and Oscar Rodriguez Maradiaga of Tegucigalpa, Honduras, both members of Pope Francis' Council of Cardinals, spoke to the Spanish weekly about the final draft of reforms the council approved at its previous meeting in early April. Vida Nueva provided Catholic News Service with an advance copy of the Spanish-language article, which was to be published April 27.  

The provisional title of the new constitution, "Praedicate Evangelium" ("Preach the Gospel"), "shows that evangelization is the number one goal, ahead of anything else," Cardinal Gracias told Vida Nueva.

"Pope Francis always emphasizes that the church is missionary," Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga said, which is why the new dicastery will supersede the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith in importance.

The new Dicastery of Evangelization will be a consolidation of the current Congregation for the Evangelization of Peoples, which coordinates the church's missionary activities, and the Pontifical Council for Promoting New Evangelization, which aims to promote a renewal of the faith in countries where Christian vitality has been waning.

Other major changes expected, the cardinals said, include: merging the Pontifical Council for Culture with the Congregation for Catholic Education; transforming the current Papal Almoner's office, which is charged with coordinating Pope Francis' acts of charity, into a Dicastery for Charity; and granting greater authority to the Pontifical Commission for the Protection of Minors.

Cardinal Gracias said it was important the papal commission remain independent from the Roman Curia in order to maintain its credibility; however, "if you are not part of the Curia, you have no power over it."

He said, "It's necessary to strike a balance between credibility and effectiveness" for the commission, whose mandate has been advising the pope and helping local churches understand and utilize best practices when it comes to safeguarding minors from abuse.

A major focus of the constitution is to create a change in mentality and in the relationship between the Holy See and the local churches, represented by the world's bishops, Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga said.

The constitution places the Vatican dicasteries at the service of both the pope and the bishops, who are "successors of the apostles" and "are not in an ecclesiological position below those who work in the Roman Curia," the Honduran cardinal said.

Cardinal Gracias said, "The pope wanted a mindset of service to prevail and that the Curia also be directly available to the bishops" in order to help them.
 
The various Vatican offices, therefore, are not meant to be something placed between the bishops and the pope nor are they to be just an "instrument" the pope uses to "supervise" the bishops; the curia is meant to be at the service of both the bishops and the pope, the Indian cardinal said.

The constitution also will include reforms that have already gone into effect, such as the creation of the Dicastery for Laity, the Family and Life, the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development and the Dicastery for Communication.

Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga said the new offices and upcoming reforms not only streamline the Curia, but also "emphasize the importance of the laity in the church and for the church" by allowing the possibility for a layperson to head a dicastery. Traditionally, congregations have a cardinal as prefect and pontifical councils have had either a cardinal or an archbishop as president.

The constitution's prologue will emphasize the missionary role of all baptized men and women, not just those who have been ordained or consecrated, the Honduran cardinal added.  

The draft has been sent to the dicasteries of the Roman Curia, the leaders of world's bishops' conferences, the synods of the Eastern Catholic churches, the conferences of major superiors of men and women religious and some pontifical universities for their observations and suggested improvements.  

The two cardinals said they do not expect major changes to come out of the consultative phase since the five-year process of drafting the constitution involved gathering the ideas and concerns of the local churches and the various Vatican offices.

It is hoped each "overall assessment" will be handed in before the end of May -- in time for the six-member Council of Cardinals to study the suggestions and have an amended draft to give to the pope to sign June 29, the feast of Sts. Peter and Paul. If the suggestions do not come in time, the constitution's publication would most likely be delayed until after the summer, the cardinals said.

The apostolic constitution will replace "Pastor Bonus," St. John Paul II's 1988 constitution reforming the Curia.

The new constitution was not going to be a mere "cosmetic change but will promote the change in mentality that has already started," Cardinal Gracias said.

"The Roman Curia will never be the same anymore," Cardinal Rodriguez Maradiaga added.

The Council of Cardinals has been advising the pope on the reform of the Curia and church governance in general since Pope Francis created the body soon after his election in 2013.

The council currently has six members: Cardinals Rodriguez Maradiaga; Gracias; Pietro Parolin, Vatican secretary of state; Sean P. O'Malley of Boston; Reinhard Marx of Munich and Freising, Germany; and Giuseppe Bertello, president of the commission governing Vatican City State.

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Copyright © 2019 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.